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Table 1 Sociodemographic characteristics of participants in the qualitative interview study

From: The role of personalised professional relations across care sectors in achieving high continuity of care

  General practices Hospitals Total
GPs VERAHsa Management Physicians Nursing staff
Age 58 (50–64)*
n = 6
40.5 (31–54)*
n = 11
50 (29–60)*
n = 15
53.5 (34–67)*
n = 6
41 (21–61)*
n = 11
47 (21–67)*
n = 49
Sex (male) 2 (33%)**
n = 6
0 (0%)**
n = 11
7 (47%)**
n = 15
5 (83%)**
n = 6
1 (9%)**
n = 11
15 (31%)**
n = 49
Urban area 3 (50%)**
n = 6
6 (60%)**
n = 10
10 (66%)**
n = 15
2 (33%)**
n = 6
7 (64%)**
n = 11
28 (60%)**
n = 49
Years of experience 16.5 (2–25)*
n = 6
17.5 (3–38)*
n = 10
12 (2–22)
n = 15
18 (7–32)
n = 6
11 (0.2528)
n = 11
14 (0.25–38)*
n = 48
Single practice 4 (67%)**
n = 6
5 (50%)**
n = 10
    9 (56%)**
n = 16
Practice size (patients per quarter year) 1467 (850–2400)*
n = 6
1775 (999–3000)*
n = 8
    1643 (850–3000)*
n = 14
Hospital size: basic and regular careb    6 (40%)**
n = 15
4 (67%)**
n = 6
7 (64%)**
n = 11
17 (53%)**
n = 32
  1. *mean (min–max), ** Frequencies (percent)a care assistant in general practiceb In Baden-Wuerttemberg (our setting), hospital supply used to be based on the division of hospitals into categories, based on the number of beds. There is a distinction between basic, regular, specialized, and maximum care (e.g. provided by university hospitals). Basic care hospitals only provide some highly used inpatient services, such as obstetrics, emergency care, and internal medicine. Albeit no longer used, this categorisation still gives an impression of the size and geographical reach of a hospital [22]. The number provided refers to hospitals that belong to the categories basic and regular care