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Table 2 Baseline characteristics of study participantsa, data from self-reported questionnaire, n = 271

From: Effects of a work stress intervention on healthcare use and treatment compared to treatment as usual: a randomised controlled trial in Swedish primary healthcare

  WSQ-IGb
% (n = 132)
Controls
% (n = 139)
Sex
 Women 67 (88) 70 (97)
 Men 33 (44) 30 (42)
Age categories
 19–30 years 16 (21) 19 (26)
 31–50 years 44 (58) 54 (76)
 51–64 years 40 (53) 27 (37)
Civil status
 Single 25 (33) 18 (25)
 Married/cohabitant 69 (91) 76 (106)
 In a relationship, live-apart 5 (7) 5 (7)
Educational level
 Compulsory schooling 10 (13) 11 (15)
 Secondary school 46 (61) 42 (59)
 University or higher 44 (57) 47 (65)
Occupational class
 Skilled/unskilled manual 37 (49) 42 (58)
 Medium/low non-manual 46 (60) 41 (56)
 High-level non-manual 17 (23) 17 (24)
Main type of employment
 Employed until further notice 79 (105) 80 (112)
 Project employee 2 (3) 1 (1)
 Substitute 2 (3) 3 (4)
 Employed by the hour 4 (5) 5 (7)
 Self-employed 6 (8) 5 (7)
 Other type of employment 6 (8) 5 (7)
Scope of work
 Full-time 76 (100) 77 (107)
 Part-time, ≥ 15 h/week 24 (31) 22 (30)
Reason for consultationc
 Mental or behavioral 57 (75) 50 (69)
 Musculoskeletal 47 (62) 32 (44)
 Gastrointestinal 20 (26) 20 (28)
 Cardiovascular 12 (16) 11 (16)
 Other 22 (29) 19 (27)
High WSQ-valuesd
 Low influence over work situation 41 (54) 39 (54)
 Indistinct organisation and conflicts 21 (28) 19 (26)
 High work commitment 48 (63) 45 (62)
 Work interference with leisure time 41 (54) 40 (55)
  1. aSome baseline characteristics are also published in the study protocol by Holmgren et al. [22]
  2. bWSQ-IG = the group that received the WSQ intervention
  3. cMultiple answers were possible
  4. dParticipants that scored values of 3 (stressful) and 4 (very stressful) on the Work Stress Questionnaire (WSQ)