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Table 2 Summary of responses to Likert scales

From: General practitioners and carers: a questionnaire survey of attitudes, awareness of issues, barriers and enablers to provision of services

  Agree Neither agree nor disagree Disagree Don't know
There is little support that general practice can offer to carers (n = 75) 7(9%) 9 (12%) 58(77%) 1 (1%)
I feel confident that I could identify the carers in my practice (n = 74) 33 (45%) 17 (23%) 21 (28%) 3 (4%)
In general I feel confident that I meet the needs of carers (n = 75) 8 (11%) 27 (36%) 36 (47%) 4(5%)
Supporting carers can be difficult (n = 74) 64 (86%) 4 (5%) 5 (7%) 1 (1%)
If the cared-for person dies, I routinely contact their carer (n = 74) 40(54%) 10 (14%) 17 (23%) 7(9%)
I take an active role in supporting carers (n = 74) 39(53%) 21 (28%) 9 (12%) 5 (7%)
There is little point in referring carers to support services as they are unlikely to use them (n = 75) 1 (1%) 11 (15%) 63 (84%) 0 (0%)
GPs should be pro-active in identifying carers (n = 75) 70 (93%) 3 (4%) 1 (1%) 1(1%)
Carers should be a partner in the health care of their cared-for person (n = 75) 63 (84%) 9(12%) 1 (1%) 2 (3%)
Confidentiality of the cared-for person can be an issue when working with carers (n = 75) 69 (92%) 3 (4%) 3 (4%) 0 (0%)
Carers are often a barrier in managing the healthcare of the cared-for person (n = 75) 7 (9%) 24 (32%) 43 (57%) 1 (1%)
Carers deserve more support from primary care teams (n = 74) 63 (85%) 10 (14%) 1 (1%) 0(0%)
Carers are no more likely to suffer from emotional problems than the public in general (n = 75) 17(23%) 2 (3%) 56 (75%) 0 (0%)
Young carers are more likely to self-harm than other young people (n = 75) 48(64%) 8 (11%) 1 (1%) 18 (24%)
The all-cause mortality rate is increased for carers (n = 75) 48(64%) 10 (13%) 1 (1%) 16 (21%)
Carers frequently have to stop paid employment once they become carers (n = 75) 60 (80%) 8 (11%) 1(1%) 6 (8%)
General practitioners are not trained sufficiently well to support carers (n = 75) 67 (89%) 5 (7%) 3 (4%) 0 (0%)
Carers from some minority ethnic groups are less likely to accept support from primary care (n = 75) 75 (61%) 19 (15%) 5 (4%) 20 (16%)
There are sufficient support services for carers (n = 75) 2 (3%) 7 (9%) 59 (79%) 7 (9%)